Staying Active in Later Life

Any level of physical activity can make a big difference to your quality of life. It can have a transformative impact on your mobility and mental well-being; improving your mood, increasing self-esteem and helping you relax.

Benefits of staying active in later life

Any level of physical activity can make a big difference to your quality of life. It can have a transformative impact on your mobility and mental well-being; improving your mood, increasing self-esteem and helping you relax. Staying active can also help you manage simple day-to-day tasks more easily, like getting dressed or washed, and it can keep you socially connected with friends and family.

What kind of exercise can I do in later life?

Physical activity doesn’t mean you need to exert high levels of energy exercising. You can improve your overall physical health by doing simple, low impact activities, some even from the comfort of your favourite chair.

Examples of low impact activities 

-          Yoga

-          Tai chi

-          Chair aerobics

-          Bowls

Examples of higher Impact activities

-          Swimming

-          Brisk walking

-          Gardening

-          Ballroom dancing

How much exercise should I do?

The NHS advise adults over the age of 65 do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity every week. This could be broken down to 30 minutes of exercise five days per week.

It’s important that you continue to build muscle strength and improve mobility and balance in later life so a mix of activies that are aerobic (walking, bowls) and strength building (swimming, yoga) will be the most beneficial to your overall health.

How do I get started?

If you’re new to physical activity it’s important you don’t over exert yourself. Start small and try to make exercise a part of your daily routine.

If you need any extra assistance have a conversation with your family, carer or house manager and see if they can help facilitate/supervise exercise sessions or provide you with any equipment you may require.

But our best advice? Get started and stick with it, you’ll soon see and feel the benefits.

 

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