Abbeyfield searching for more young volunteers!

Date: 29/3/2012

Young benefit from volunteering

Record numbers of unemployed people are taking the plunge into the world of charity work and community projects in exchange for valuable skills.  A large percentage of these are under thirty.

Abbeyfield welcomes this news as it is very keen to forge relationships with younger people and is currently in the process of trying to attract them to volunteer for Abbeyfield.  They have developed a menu of roles and new volunteering initiatives which has increased enquiries from this group..

Kate Edwards, Young Volunteer Coordinator for Abbeyfield says: " The experience that people gain through volunteering, can definitely stand them in good stead when applying for paid positions or even highly sought after university places."

We find that this demographic, generally tend to overlook our charity when they consider volunteering , which is a real shame as our residents really do benefit from the exposure to different age groups and enjoy their company.  We have also found that the younger people that do choose to volunteer for us find the exchange they share with older people really rewarding too.

Inter- Generational Skills Swap for Abbeyfield Week

Abbeyfield Week, held betweeen 9th - 16th June is an opportunity for our houses and homes to open their doors to the local community. Once again the theme will be an inter-generational Skills Swap - a chance for local schools, colleges asnd youbng volunteers to interact with our residents and swap skills from modern technology knoweldge to knitting, baking cakes to playing traditional games. Last year, residents enjoyed  the experience hugely and the young people who came in to participate also found it incredibly rewarding. 

The proof is in the pudding

Kate said "Volunteering for a charity is a win win for all parties, most importantly, it helps charities such as Abbeyfield, who don't have access to the big budgets or mass support  enjoyed by other larger charities.

  • it's a brilliant way to upskill
  • It conveys a lot of positive qualities that employers and universities look for in candidates
  • It is a great way for young volunteers to obtain a reference

She continued: "Whether the free time is due to unemployment or a gap year is irrelevant, young people should seek any opportunity  that  helps to put them ahead and if a charity such as Abbeyfield can benefit in the process then that's even better. 

Abbeyfield has had three people  that  volunteered with them at national office  for six months or less, that have since found employment;  one of which secured a position with the charity.  By giving time freely, it means you're first in line when a position does become available and the cherry on top is, that in the process  you might well find it rewarding to give something back to society like many others who volunteer."

The experience that people gain through volunteering, can definitely stand them in good stead when applying for paid positions or even highly sought after university places

Kate Edwards, young volunteer coordinator

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